Science writer, scholar and speaker at academic conferences and at events for non-specialist audiences.  Areas of expertise are in ancient economic history, archaeology and game theory focusing on the economics of conflict in antiquity. After teaching game theory for almost a decade, I am passionate about maths and human behaviour. My quest is to discover how we can sustain peace. First, however, we must fully understand the causes of conflict. Here you will find my thoughts...

 

Science writer, scholar and speaker at academic conferences and at events for non-specialist audiences.  Areas of expertise are in ancient economic history, archaeology and game theory focusing on the economics of conflict in antiquity. After teaching game theory for almost a decade, I am passionate about maths and human behaviour. My quest is to discover how we can sustain peace. First, however, we must fully understand the causes of conflict. Here you will find my thoughts...

groovy PAST + dead serious PRESENT

Game theory and the Melian Dialogue

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Tragedy of the Spectrum Commons

A Myth or Reality?

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Curriculum Vitae

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Thucydides, Father of Game Theory

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Interdisciplinary Game Theory

Coming soon

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Game theory on the street

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Forthcoming Public Talk

New Scientist Instant Expert

'Hardest Problem in Maths'

When: September 5th, 2020

Where: British Library

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What are the mathematical secrets hidden in the works of the ancient Greek historians, Herodotus and Thucydides, the philosophers, Plato and Aristotle and the Roman political writers, Cicero and Pliny the Younger. They spoke a common language that today is translated into the maths we call Game Theory– a mathematical theory of interaction that involves individual decision makers. Their discoveries help us to answer the hardest maths question of all – Why do we fight? Together they contributed to the discovery of the drivers of conflict, be it war among nations, civil war, corporations competing, couples divorcing or even YOU arguing with a work colleague!